Help Protect The Giant Tortoise

Protecting and Preserving the Giant Tortoise and habitat

  • Seychelles
  • hello@gvitrust.org

Donate to this project

For every £1 you donate, 85p goes directly to our projects and the other 15p helps us carry on our work.

GBP

Curieuse Island hosts one of the largest populations of Aldabra giant tortoise outside of Aldabra Atoll. Reintroduced in the early 1980s, the population has struggled to remain stable, thought to be due to predation on juveniles by rats, and from poaching by humans. We have been monitoring the population since 2013, and every individual is implanted with an internal electronic tag. This allows the identification and tracking of each individual over time and provides a significant deterrent to poaching. Any new hatchlings found in the field are relocated to a nursery at the Ranger Station where they are also electronically tagged, and cared for until they are large enough to survive in the wild, free of the risk of predation.

Continued monitoring and tagging of free ranging and hatchling tortoises is essential to the survival and growth of the population on Curieuse. Without regular supplies of electronic tags and tag scanners the project would not be able to continue.

Increase of the Aldabra giant tortoise population on Curieuse Island back to historically natural levels. The tortoises are a major attraction for visitors to the island, all of whom pay a landing fee. This fee significantly contributes to the economy of the Seychelles and partly funds the local partners in their efforts to sustainably manage the island.

Curieuse Island hosts one of the largest populations of Aldabra giant tortoise outside of Aldabra Atoll. Reintroduced in the early 1980s, the population has struggled to remain stable, thought to be due to predation on juveniles by rats, and from poaching by humans. We have been monitoring the population since 2013, and every individual is implanted with an internal electronic tag. This allows the identification and tracking of each individual over time and provides a significant deterrent to poaching. Any new hatchlings found in the field are relocated to a nursery at the Ranger Station where they are also electronically tagged, and cared for until they are large enough to survive in the wild, free of the risk of predation.

Continued monitoring and tagging of free ranging and hatchling tortoises is essential to the survival and growth of the population on Curieuse. Without regular supplies of electronic tags and tag scanners the project would not be able to continue.

Increase of the Aldabra giant tortoise population on Curieuse Island back to historically natural levels. The tortoises are a major attraction for visitors to the island, all of whom pay a landing fee. This fee significantly contributes to the economy of the Seychelles and partly funds the local partners in their efforts to sustainably manage the island.

Global goals and targets